Spectacle Spectacular:  Etcetera
Featured here on the Spectacle Spectacular: Etc page are works made within the theme, but do not collectively fit into one
category or the previous
Spectacle Spectacular pages.  
Sid and Nancy Go Back to the Beach, graphite, acrylic, ink, pen and silver leaf on paper, 30" x 55", 2007
Bling Bling:  Boobatopia
pencil, ink, pen, and silver leaf on paper
72" x 80", 2007
Please click on the
thumbnails of the
installation shots (right)
to view a larger images.
Just a Bit of Cookie:  Super Cookie, acrylic and ink on paper, 12" x 18", 2005
Just a Bit of Cookie:  Dirty Sweet, acrylic and ink on paper, 12" x 18", 2005
Trained Groupies, graphite and ink on paper, 24" x 40", 2005
Stray, graphite and ink on paper, 30" x 50", 2005
Nice Girls Don't Draw Like That, graphite and ink on paper, 24" x 40", 2005
All of the images on this page are thumbnails, please click on the thumbnails of each work below to view a larger, full screen image.
The punk movement failed when in 1975 it became an exported commodity to American teens. The Sex Pistols, particularly Sid Vicious, are often portrayed as
emblematic representations of anarchy.  The Sex Pistols' music has often been perceived as a response to the manufactured pop music of the mid- 1970s.  Ironically
though, the band was conceived and managed by Malcom McLaren, the anti-Dick Clark.  They are a forth generation fabricated boy band, following The Monkees, The
Jackson Five and The Osmond Brothers, and the signify punk's demise with an ordered sense of marketing.  This converted the movement from a statement of
philosophy into one of fashion, lifestyle and capitalism.  The contemporary punk ideology exists as a form of tourism.  By that I mean through fashion, one can therefore
participate in urban fantasies of anarchy.
recent studio work about Ramón y Cajal.
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